Monday, May 30, 2016

Which Way To Publish?

I know this is thinking too far ahead, but someone I know brought up something about publishing. A lady who attends the mental health center that I attend and work at, writes poetry.  Our center director asked her if she had been published. The lady said she'd gotten one of her poems published in Reader's Digest.  She then suggested the idea of me trying to publish trying to publish my memoir in a magazine rather than trying to publish it as a book right away.


Is this a good idea? Do people still serialize stories in publications? I'm afraid no one I know will see it or read it this way.  Furthermore, it seems that this only for fiction. Do publications serialize memoirs? Suggested publications were medical journals or Psychology Today.  But such journals will only publish stuff from non-medical professionals.  I was told this in a writing group I joined on Facebook.
My story is just too long for Reader's Digest. 

Again, is this a good idea? And what is your opinion of possibly self-publishing?

Sunday, May 29, 2016

Next Steps in Editing

Last night I was wide awake and began editing what I had printed, checking mainly for spelling errors and spacing errors (either failing to space between words and typing a little too much space).  I also started deleting what I found unnecessary or repetitive. I had begun done this when converting my handwritten story to typed form, but I'm still finding repetitive or unnecessary pieces of writing. It's the way writing works, I guess :-)

While editing my printed form, I was having flashbacks to my high school journalism class and the editing symbols we used. I remembered many of them, but don't always do it that way when editing. Some of those shown below I don't seem to remember learning:

Any of you writers out there--do you use these symbols when editing?  Most of the time, when I began editing my work, I would just cross out misspelled words and write the correct spelling above it.  I don't seem to remember that first one mentioned in the photo. I tend to just cross out a word that needs to be deleted. I guess each person has their way of  doing this.  

Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Never Using Algebra

I went looking for a drink-holder at Dollar Tree the other day and eventually went with this one:


So true. When I had to take algebra in high school it didn't dawn on me at first that I would not be using it later in life.  But after a while, I did began to feel that way, and I later felt the same with geometry theorems.  

When seeing this I was reminded me of this meme I'd seen earlier this year as tax season had approached:


I now wonder why we were never taught how balance a checkbook or do taxes in school.  I did have to take economics in high school, and the only lesson they gave us on checks was in a film we watched for the class. Not sure if they talked about doing taxes, though.  If not, they should have.

Have you found yourself using algebra since high school and/or college? I'm guessing not.

Monday, May 23, 2016

Finished Typing

Yesterday I finished converting my handwritten notes to typed form.  Excluding the title and contents pages, my story is 87 typed pages.  A lot of thought went into what to delete and add to what I'd written down. I know I have made some typing errors and have to check for repetitive stuff I may have missed already.

Here is what I have chosen as my title (copied from the title page in my document; I changed the font color to add some color to this post):

Delays and Detours on the Road to Prozac:
A Memoir of Depression and Anxiety
 by Jamie Ghione
And my table of contents (chapter titles) page:

  PROLOGUE
1. NOT LIKE MOST KIDS
2. BULLIED FOR RIDICULOUS REASONS
3. IN THE BEGINNING
4. TRAGEDY IN 2001
5. THINGS I NEVER GOT TO DO OR HAVE
6. PERSONAL TRAUMAS OF 2008
7. NOT FEELING GOOD ENOUGH
8. SUSPICIONS OF CRAZINESS AND DEPRESSION
9. TENDENCIES OF BOREDOM AND FATIGUE 
10. MISCONCEPTIONS OF MENTAL ILLNESS
11. JEALOUSY OF OTHERS
12. NOT TRYING TO BE SELFISH, JUST PRIVATE
13. “I DON’T LIKE OR KNOW WHO I AM”
14. GOING BACK TO GET HELP
15. ON THE ROAD TO THE PROZAC JOURNEY
EPILOGUE: FARTHER ON DOWN THE ROAD 



Before typing, I had jotted down some words, phrases and place names that might need explanation. I mentioned several cities, including my hometown, that many people outside of California may not know about, be included in an index. I haven't typed this part, though.

As always is the question, "What to do next?"

Sunday, May 22, 2016

Semi-Charmed Summer 2016 Book Challenge

Since I was an earlier finisher of the Winter 2015 challenge, I got to pick a category for the Summer 2016 challenge and will thus be in again. Click here to sign up and see more details.



General rules:

  • The challenge will run from June 1, 2016, to August 31, 2016. No books that are started before 12 a.m. on June 1 or finished after 11:59 p.m. on August 31 will count.
  • Each book must be at least 150 pages long. Audiobooks and large-print books are fine, as long as the regular print version meets the length requirement.
  • A book can only be used for one category, and each category can only be completed once.
  • The highest possible total is 200 points, and the first five people who finish the challenge will be invited to contribute a category for the winter 2016 challenge.

And now for the exciting part: the challenge categories!

5 points: Freebie! Read any book that is at least 150 pages long.

10 points: Read a collection of short stories or essays. They may all be written by the same author, or the book may be an anthology from different writers; your choice!

10 points: Read an adult fiction book written by an author who normally writes books for children. Examples: J. K. Rowling, Judy Blume, Suzanne Collins, Rick Riordan, etc. - Submitted by SCWBC15 finisher Kelly E.

15 points: Read a book set in Appalachia. - Submitted by SCWBC15 finisher Ericka B. (Try this listor this one for inspiration. And here’s a map if you have a book in mind and want to know if it fits the setting.)

15 points: Don’t judge a book by its cover! Read a book with a cover you personally find unappealing.

20 points: Read a book that you have previously only seen the film (movie) of. - Submitted by SCWBC15 finisher Bevchen.

25 points: Read a book with a punny title. The title can be a play on another book title, movie title or a common expression. Examples of such titles include Southern DiscomfortWe'll Always Have Parrots or Bonefire of the Vanities
- Submitted by SCWBC15 finisher Jamie G. 

30 points: Read a microhistory. (Try this list or this one for ideas.)

30 points: Read one book with a good word in the title, and one with a bad word. Note: This category is reeeeeeeally open-ended! Maybe you like turtles, so The Pearl that Broke Its Shell is a title with a "good" word. Similarly, the "bad" word could be a swear word or a literally negative word like “not” or “none,” or it could just be something you don’t like. Have fun with it! (Remember, you must read both books to get 30 points; this category is not worth 15 points per book.)

40 points: Read two books that contain the same word in the title, but once in the singular and once in the plural. For example: Pretty Girls by Karin Slaughter and The Girl in the Red Coat by Kate Hamer, or Fates and Furies by Lauren Groff and The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner.(Remember, you must read both books to get 40 points; this category is not worth 20 points per book.)

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

How I Have Been Editing

Even before I started typing what I had hand written, I was already mentally editing it. And tonight as typed three more chapters, I found them too long and somewhat repetitive so I cut out a great chunk on two of them and condensed some of it down. My notes for  Chapter 11 were especially  long, a lot had to be taken out.  I  carefully decided what needed to go and what seemed repetitive from previous and subsequent chapters (those I have yet to type) and within each chapter itself.

This definitely is how to write, I have been told.

As of now, typing chapters 12-15 and the epilogue remain to be done. One of these is already pretty short.  I'm anxious to see how many I get typed tomorrow.

Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Longest Paper I Have Ever Typed

To the best of my knowledge, anyway.  I wrote 15 chapters along with the prologue and epilogue. As of now (prior to typing this blogpost),  I have typed and printed the prologue and chapters 1-8, as well as a title page and a table of contents page. Excluding these two pages, my current page count is 47. It's like the college thesis I never wrote.

What, you may be asking?  I didn't write a thesis in college?  Well, not in the way that most people are familiar with the concept.  I was a literature major and where I went to college, we had the option of doing a traditional undergraduate thesis with faculty sponsor or the senior seminar option. The latter will need some explanation. A class taught as a seminar (as opposed to being taught as a lecture) could be used as our exit requirement.  Various such classes on different literature topics were offered each quarter. An essay was required for the class. In some ways, this was like doing a thesis, but it was part of a credit class.  The length of the essay varied by each class and instructor. The class I took for this requirement was on slavery reading. I don't remember too many details about it, though. I always had  to type papers in college, but this senior essay was probably the longest one I had to do then. I seem to recall the required length being 10 pages.

I'm now pondering the idea of going to graduate school, thinking that if I should do so, I'll now be prepared to write a lengthy thesis. I am not certain of whether I'll be doing that, however.  For now, I want to finish typing my memoir, typing as many chapters as I can each day.